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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Shinya Yamanaka

Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Shinya Yamanaka: When I went to my second lab, in Nara, it was my first time to be the so-called "principal investigator." So I became independent for the first time in my scientific career. That means I will have to have many students and many post-docs, so I thought I really have to have some wonderful research project in my own lab to attract as many people as possible. So I thought what the goal should be, and I thought making stem cells from patients' own cells should be my goal. That was the beginning of my full research.
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Chuck Yeager

First Man to Break the Sound Barrier

Chuck Yeager: Well, number one, they built the airplane with very thin wings so that the airplane could go faster before it ran into the buffeting problems. It was rocket-powered, which meant that you had full thrust at altitude -- jet engines decrease in thrust the higher you go -- and it was built about two-and-one-half times stronger than airplanes that we were flying at that time. The airplanes that we used in World War II, and the ones that were built immediately after World War II, were stressed for 7.33 Gs, or 7.33 times the pull of gravity and, if you overstressed them, they would break, obviously. The wings would break off and the like. But the X-1 was stressed for 18 Gs, positive or negative. So it would stay together in case you run into a problem. And also, it had a moveable, horizontal stabilizer. The tail-plane on all airplanes just stabilizes, and you have elevators on the back to make the airplane go up and down. Well, they built the capability into the X-1 to move the whole angle of the horizontal stabilizer, change the angle with that. That really was the big secret on how we got the airplane through the speed of sound. That horizontal stabilizer.
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

What it took was a national movement that brought together the churches, the university community. It was what Dr. King called a coalition of goodwill, a coalition of conscience. And he said, "We'll never be a majority. We'll never be a black majority, but there is in America a majority of people of goodwill. And it doesn't matter what color they are, what their vocations are, or their national origin or religion. We want to gather this coalition of conscience to help change America." And we not only did that, but I think that his speech so electrified not only the audience there, but it was heard around the world. It linked up the dreams and aspirations of an oppressed people with the Constitution of the United States, which was linked to the creation of God, by God. We are endowed not by wealth or color, we are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights. That meant not just Americans were endowed by the creator. Americans were the first to recognize it, but when they heard that in Communist East Germany, they started singing "We Shall Overcome," too. When they heard that in South Africa -- so I think -- and the farm workers of California and Texas, with Cesar Chavez. This became a rallying cry to change the world without violence, and we've almost succeeded.
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

We still have made progress. We've made progress on race, but it wasn't about race. And it wasn't just about war. We've made progress on war. But we've not made a great deal of progress on dealing with poverty. In fact the percentage of people in poverty now, in 2013, is larger than the percentage of people -- we were all moving into the middle class in 1963. By 2013, we're losing ground in the middle class, and not gaining much in the poor. So we still have something to march about. But the difference now is that we know -- since Martin Luther King made that speech -- we've understood that there's no such thing as a national economy. That our economies are intertwined, that we're all part of a global, he would say it, "network of mutuality." We're bound together in a single garment of destiny. Not only black and white, but with China. China and India, and Europe and Japan, and Latin America. So we are not going to solve the problems of poverty for Americans alone. We're going to have to expand Martin Luther King's dream, and our thinking, to include all of God's children, because our Constitution says that all men -- and we assume women and children -- are endowed by the Creator with those inalienable rights. We as Americans are the champions of human rights. It's a revelation from God to our Founding Fathers. But it's not something that we can hoard. It's like my grandmamma told me, "To those to whom much has been given, of them will much be required."
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

On the way back from Howard University, in the days of segregation, we couldn't live in hotels and motels, so we stopped at Kings Mountain, North Carolina, where there was a church conference going on. My parents were members of the church, and I wasn't interested in the church, but I'd been on the track team and swimming team and I thought I was an athlete. So while they went to the meetings, I went out running. And I literally ran to the top of this mountain, and pushed myself to total exhaustion. I could hardly breathe, and when I looked up, I took off my shirt and put it on a rock, because I was wringing wet, and I looked out at the horizon and it just hit me that everything out here has a purpose. Everything is there for a reason. God could not have created all of this and there not be a reason for me. And I came down that mountain with just a sense of peace that there must be some purpose for my life, and I don't know what it is, but I'm going to find it, and I'm going to follow it, one day at a time. And that's what I've been doing for the last 60 years.
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

Everything I did, and I think everything Martin Luther King did, was because we allowed our lives to be in tune with what we felt to be a divine purpose. And it didn't matter whether we lived or died. It didn't matter how much money we made, or what we accomplished. If we were following the will of God, miracles would be wrought. And they don't have to be in politics, you know, they could be in science, they could be in economics. Right now, I hope this doesn't take 50 years, but we have to reposition America's economy to be a global leader in a global economy. You can actually, I can transfer more money around the world with my cell phone than existed in the United States 50 years ago. So we've had an explosion of technology which has made us increasingly aware of the needs of the world. We really have more money than we know what to do with. There's more money in hiding in tax havens right now than is in circulation in the U.S., Europe and China economies, all put together. So we've got to find a way to create a global economic order, that I think only the United States can lead, out of the same vision and dream that Martin Luther King expressed 50 years ago. I think 50 years from now we should have accomplished that, but there will still be something. We will probably be trying to figure out what's under the sea, or we will know how to go further in space. But the future is limitless, and we're only limited by our own fears and insecurities. And with faith in God, and faith in the freedoms and ideals that we have been taught by our ancestors, all things are possible. Only believe. Jesse Jackson used to say that if you can conceive it and believe it, you can achieve it. I like that.
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